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Father Noah's Ark

A Silly Symphony

Release Date : April 8, 1933

Running Time : 8:24

Synopsis

A musical retelling of the Biblical story of Noah and the ark.

Characters

Noah
Noah's Wife
Hem, Shem and Japeth
Hem, Shem and Japeth's Wives

Credits

Director
Wilfred Jackson
Animation
Ed Love
Charles Couch
Paul Fennell
Norm Ferguson
Gerry "Clyde" Geronomi
Dick Lundy
Ben Sharpsteen
Joe D'Igalo
Bob Kuwahara
Dick Williams
Jack Cutting
Hardie Gramatky
Leonard Sebring
Cy Young
Nick George
Harry Reeves
Roy Williams
Tom Bonfiglio
Bill Roberts
Marvin Woodward
Louie Schmitt
Hamilton Luske
Voices
J. Delos Jewkes

Source

Based on the story "Noah's Ark"

Video

United States
Starring Silly Symphonies
Cartoon Classics : First Series : Volume 13 : Fanciful Fables

Laserdiscs

Silly Symphonies / Animals Two by Two
Cartoon Classics : Fanciful Fables

DVD

Disney Treasures : Silly Symphonies
Germany
Disney Treasures : Silly Symphonies
France
Disney Treasures : Silly Symphonies
Italy
Disney Treasures : Silly Symphonies
Sweden
Disney Treasures : Silly Symphonies
United Kingdom
Disney Treasures : Silly Symphonies

Television

The Ink and Paint Club: Episode 13: Silly Symphonies Get Wet
Mickey's Mouse Tracks: Episode 21
The Mickey Mouse Club : February 20, 1956

Technical Specification

Color Type: Technicolor
Animation Type: Standard animation
Sound Mix: Mono
Aspect Ratio: 1.37 : 1
Negative Format: 35mm
Print Format: 35mm
Cinematographic Process: Spherical
Original Language: English

Released by United Artists Pictures

Comments

From Rod Bennett : This short, with its storybook approach and use of negro spirituals on the soundtrack, seems to have been inspired by Marc Connelly's then-current Broadway hit "The Green Pastures." Also, one particular gag here gets memorably recycled seven years later in "Fantasia" : the lightning bolt which finally drives the reluctant donkey aboard the ark is recalled for duty in the "Pastoral Symphony" segment to coax a reluctant "Bacchus" in out of the rain.
From Jerry Edwards : I enjoyed some fun scenes of the animals helping to build the ark. The closing scene shows large dogs rushing off the ark to a large trees while puppies rush to a small sapling. Disney later did a 1959 stop-motion short called Noah's Ark. I tend to get the two titles mixed up, since I automatically assume "Noah's Ark" would be the title for the first short.
From Gijs Grob : The biblical story of Noah has been quite popular with the Disney Studio: it has been retold on film three times. Father Noah's Ark is the first version, the others are a stop motion film from 1959 and a sequence from Fantasia 2000 featuring Donald Duck. This cartoon tells the age old story as a musical, including some gospel singing. The story is quite straightforward and the short contains only a few mild gags. The design seems to be half-hearted: Father Noah's sons look ridiculously cartoony, wearing Mickey Mouse type gloves, for instance. Their wives, on the other hand, are designed in art deco fashion. The animals, too, are in different stages of naturalism, but the cows portrayed are much more realistic than the ones featured in the Mickey Mouse shorts of the same time. The most stunning naturalism is found in the animation of the sea when the ark is at the mercy of the waves. This is a spectacular scene by all means.
From Ryan : This is probably the only Bible story that Disney made a cartoon of (they later made another version using office supplies). The people in this cartoon are primitively animated compared to those in feature films such as "Snow White" and "Pinocchio." I particularly like the gag at the end in which the dogs get off the ark and run toward a fire hydrant.
From Kyle Peters : Who built the ark? Father Noah! It is so funny but it wasn't perfect. Nothing is, right?
From Jennie : I love this site! The commentary really enhances my appreciation for the work and context of each piece. One thing that struck me as odd though - in Ryan Kilpatrick's commentary to "Father Noah's Ark", he explains that Noah is a "devout christian". This is an anachronism. The story of Noah's Ark is in the Old Testament, nowhere near when there was such a thing as a "christian". I suppose he could be referred to as just "devout", but certainly not a christian.

Referenced Comments